How to survive (and thrive!) for 17 days in an inside room

Plenty of cruisers are perfectly happy to stay in an inside cabin. My friend Emma over at Cruising Isn’t Just for Old People has written a great blog post about her experiences in inside rooms. Inside cabins are fantastic for sleeping, especially if you like it pitch dark! And Emma and I both agree that inside cabins are the best way to afford your cruising habit. 🙂

The hubby and I recently took advantage of some last minute deals on a couple of Celebrity cruises and booked an inside guarantee cabin for each one. Because one was a 10-night cruise and the other a 7-nighter, that means we spent a total of 17 nights in an inside room, although we fortunately did have a few nights on land (with a window) in between. After that time, I think I’ve learned a few things about how to make an inside cabin as painless as possible.

A place for everything, and everything in its place. The hubby will tell you that I’m not a particularly neat person at home – there’s a reason my nickname growing up was “Messy Jessie.” In an inside cabin, though, it’s important to find a place to put everything away and to try your best to keep things tidy. I also find it’s good to establish a place for things you’ll use often (such as your SeaPass card) and to always return the item to that place once you’re finished with it. (This is especially important if you’re an early riser, as I’ll discuss below.)

Bring a nightlight. We always travel with an LED nightlight, whether we’re cruising or at a hotel or some other kind of rental. On a cruise, a nightlight can be kind of tricky, because many cruise ships (especially the ones built more than 7-10 years ago) still don’t have a lot of plugs. But if you’re in an inside cabin, there’s absolutely zero light – so a nightlight is vital if someone needs to get up in the middle of the night. (To deal with the power plug shortage, we always travel with a 4-port USB hub and a portable brick charger so we can charge phones and such without using up one of the wall plugs.)

Establish a meeting point (outside). I usually want to wake up about an hour before the hubby does, so on every cruise we establish a meeting point where I’ll go to when I wake up and go for coffee in the mornings. If you purchase an internet package, this isn’t so much of a problem; but if you don’t have wifi, it can be remarkably difficult to find another person on a cruise ship. Picking a default rendezvous spot can be helpful when one person doesn’t want to be in the inside cabin anymore but wants to make sure the other(s) can find her. It also helps for me to set out the things I’ll need in the morning (clothes, shoes, book to read, SeaPass, etc) so that I can access them easily in the dark room.

Consider a sunrise clock. Emma has a great post on her use of a sunrise clock, which to be honest I haven’t tried myself yet, because as I mention the hubby likes to sleep later than I do. But I think this would be a great way to deal with the darkness of an inside room! I might buy one of these to try on my transatlantic cabin in a solo (inside) cabin on the new Norwegian Bliss.

One thing is for sure: You can definitely get some good deals on inside cabins, and especially if you’re willing to book a guarantee room. On longer cruises, or when the price difference isn’t too much, I’ll sometimes splurge on an oceanview or a balcony. But if you know how to do it, taking an inside cabin can be a great way to help you cruise for less – or even cruise more often!

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